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Aeshah Matingka

 

This chair sums up humble beginnings. Our parents taught us the value of education, and the virtue humility & generosity. They rose from poverty through perseverance and determination. Both obtained a college degree and built successful careers. Generosity is the greatest legacy our parents passed on to us. Our dream is to constantly fund reading and literacy program for indigenous women and youths in our father's hometown. We begin our story with small acts of charity so they can start theirs.

 

 

  

 

 

Randy John Pablo

 

My father worked as street sweeper. His income wasn’t enough, but he made sure my siblings and I was able to go to school. My father taught us the value of hard work, honesty & respect, even though we suffered from the cruelty of poverty. Today, I was able to establish my own house, and open an internet cafe business. My only regret is that my father did not get to witness this anymore because he died before my graduation. The road toward financial freedom is just starting, and I will continue to choose that path.

 

 

  

 

 

Dexter Bordeos

 

This photo reminds me of how we grew up, living a life where my father and uncle would stay in the middle of the ocean for 3 days and 2 nights to fish, but would come back with very little harvest that wasn’t even enough for us to buy a kilo of rice. It’s really hard to be a fisherman, especially when the moon is full. That is why this photo inspires me to work harder as an overseas worker, so I could help my family, especially my father, and return the favor of raising me to become a good person and father to my soon-to-be family.

 

 

  

 

 

Giselle Acapulco

 

My father was a seafarer. He is the man who molded me to be the best I can be. He is a very responsible father & loving husband to my mother, a good provider who always walks an extra mile not just for us, his family, but for those in need. Until he met an accident and lost his legs. He is now wearing prosthesis, but unfortunately it has worn out, and getting a new pair is very expensive. The prosthesis may be closer to its farewell and that motivates me to work harder to get him a new pair.

 

 

  

 

 

Claudine Ochoa

 

Meet Sabina, my beautiful daughter. What you don't see though is the rare and incurable disease called Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Disorder that Sabina lives with every single day. Sabina cannot walk, talk, or sit up on her own; her development is that of a seven month old baby despite now being seven years old. Sabina however, is our blessing, and our joy! We do not stop dreaming and hoping for a cure! And despite the many challenges ahead, Sabina's smile alone makes everything worth it.

 

 

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